Showing all 10 results

Birds Eye Ottawa

$27.99
  • Greyscale Bird’s eye view of Ottawa
  • 28″ x 22″

Contained within the Historical Maps, 1639 to 1949, Atlas of Canada map series, is a reproduction of one of the bird’s eye view sketches of cities which were very popular in the late 19th century. In this case, it is a black-and-white sketch drawn by Herm. Brosius and originally published by Chicago Litho. Co. As of 1876, Ottawa consisted of only part of Centretown, Byward, and Sandy Hill. The view lists dozens of major buildings at the time. It also has a sketch of the three buildings of Parliament. Of interest, all streets and railway lines are named.

Ottawa & Toronto

$27.99
  • Ottawa & Toronto
  • 27″ x 20″

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows a map with four condensed maps of the cities Toronto and Ottawa. The first two maps show the extent and classification of land use circa 1955 for both Toronto and Ottawa. For Toronto, stages of urban growth are shown for periods ranging from 1793 to 1955 and for Ottawa, the periods range from 1826 to 1955. The urban growth maps represent the expansion of areas occupied by structures, yet the small open areas classified as parks and playgrounds on the land-use maps are also included. These two remaining maps show the extent and classification of land use for both of these cities. The classifications for land-use maps were separated into Industrial buildings; Industrial yards; Commercial buildings; Commercial yards; Railways and their installations; Institutional buildings; Residential buildings; Cemeteries; Dominantly farm land; Vacant land. In areas classified as dominantly farm land, vacant land includes forested areas, swamps, bogs and all large areas not put to specific agricultural use.

Populated Places – Great Lakes Area

$27.99
  • Populated Places – Great Lakes Area
  • 27″ x 20″

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows as many populated places in the Great Lakes area as the scale of the map will permit. It also indicates, within certain limits, the number of inhabitants at each place according to the 1951 Census of Canada. The map also distinguishes between those places which were incorporated in cities, towns, and villages and those which were not. Therefore, it shows the urban municipalities in those parts of Ontario and Quebec covered by the map.

Populated Places – Prairies

$27.99
  • Populated Places – Prairies
  • 27″ x 20″

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows as many populated places in the prairies as the scale of the map will permit. It also indicates, within certain limits, the number of inhabitants at each place according to the 1956 Census of Canada. The map also distinguishes between those places which were incorporated and those which were not. Therefore, it shows the urban municipalities in those parts of the various provinces covered by the map. Traditionally the Prairie Region is considered to consist of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba yet this map omits much of Alberta and includes part of northwestern Ontario.

Quebec City & Montreal

$27.99
  • Quebec City and Montreal
  • 26″ x 20″

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows a map with four condensed maps comparing Quebec City and Montreal. The first two maps show stages of urban growth for Quebec City for periods ranging from 1608 to 1955 and Montreal for periods ranging from 1642 to 1955. The urban growth maps on the other two maps represent the expansion of areas occupied by structures, yet the small open areas classified as parks and playgrounds on the land-use maps are also included. These two remaining maps show the extent and classification of land use for 1955 for both of these cities. The classifications for land-use maps were separated into Industrial buildings; Industrial yards; Commercial buildings; Commercial yards; Railways and their installations; Institutional buildings; Residential buildings; Cemeteries; Dominantly farm land; Vacant land. In areas classified as dominantly farm land, vacant land includes forested areas, swamps, bogs and all large areas not put to specific agricultural use.

Railway Freight Traffic

$27.99
  • Railway Freight Traffic
  • 27″ x 20″

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows three condensed maps of Canadian railway traffic circa 1954. Net tons per mile of road operated are indicated. ‘Net tons per mile of road operated’ is to be understood as meaning that, in 1954, the total net freight passing any point on a given line was of the tonnage indicated by the flow line at that point. In a few areas on the maps, traffic carried by lines closely paralleling each other and providing duplicate service between the same points is indicated by one pair of flow lines only. The flow data is broken down to show flow direction (either east and south or west and north). Data for freight carried by Canadian railways in the United States of America were not available.

Railways in Canada

$27.99
  • The fall of Germany is depicted in this map showing the Allies deep into the heart of Germany.
  • 27″ x 20″

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the pattern of the Canadian railway network. Lines of the principal railway companies are shown in colour, while those for smaller companies have the name of the operator written beside their lines. The map gives substantial US coverage as well: it shows links to US rail companies, and also the location of American lines owned by Canadian railway companies. The map also has a table listing railway distances between 14 major centers.

Railways of Ontario & Quebec

$27.99
  • Railways of Ontario and Quebec
  • 24″ x 27″

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the rail companies that operated in Ontario and western Quebec, circa 1904. The railway lines are indicated in black, and the territory tributary to each line is shown in colours. For example, any area coloured green, is in a close proximity to a specific station on the Intercolonial railway, then to a station on any other system. This method is similarly applied to the other lines. The map includes statistics of the mileage, rolling stock, receipts, cost of construction and the cost of maintenance of the various railway lines for 1903-04. Some mileage data is as of 1905. The table also gives the Canadian total for these statistics as of June 30, 1904. The map displays the railway systems running across the border and into part of the U.S., but they do not own or control the Canadian railways.

Routes of the Explorers

$27.99

35lb heavyweight coated paper.
Map comes rolled up.
Perfect paper to unroll on your table and study the battlefield.
Size: 24″ H x 27″ W.
DESIGNED AND MADE IN CANADA.

 

Vancouver & Victoria

$27.99
  • Vancouver & Victoria
  • 27″ x 20″

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows four condensed maps of both Vancouver and Victoria. The first two maps display stages of urban growth for Vancouver, for periods ranging from 1886 to 1956 and Victoria, for periods ranging from 1851 to 1955. The two remaining maps show the extent and classification of land use for 1955 for both of these cities. The urban growth maps represent the expansion of areas occupied by structures, yet the small open areas classified as parks and playgrounds on the land-use maps are also included.