The World Wall Map

$34.99
  • The World Wall Map
  • 50″ x 35″

Contained within the Atlas of Canada’s Reference Map Series, 1961 to 2010, is the latest version of a regularly-updated map of the National Atlas of Canada Base Map Series. Each version shows the World at an equatorial scale of 1: 35 000 000. The map is a general reference sheet focusing on showing the name and status of all sovereign countries and dependencies and showing major cities. The 2005 version has two new additions: one is showing shaded relief for land areas; the other is showing bathymetric contours and colours for all marine areas.

Relief of Canada

$29.99
  • Relief of Canada Wall Map
  • 43″ x 36″

Contained within the Atlas of Canada’s Reference Map Series, 1961 to 2010, is a map showing Canada with a very-detailed digital shaded relief. Ocean contours are shown using bathymetric tints. Major physical features including mountain ranges, peaks, and spot elevations are identified. The map also shows the extent and name for all of Canada’s national parks. An extensive set of populated places is shown, using six population size classes. Transportation data is extensive but relatively muted: for example, roads are only in two classes. All official Canadian, provincial, and surrounding international boundaries are shown, including the proposed boundary for the new territory of Nunavut (which came into existence in 1999), The offshore boundary delineating Canada’s exclusive 200-mile fishing and economic zone is also shown. There are three small maps of Canada shown on this map sheet, all at scale 1: 35 000 000. One shows the major physiographic regions; the second shows major drainage basins, and the third map shows classes of vegetation cover. There is very limited data shown for foreign areas, but shaded relief is shown for all of these areas. All data on the map is current to the mid to late 1990’s.

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North Circumpolar Wall Map

$29.99 $25.99
  • North Circumpolar Wall Map
  • 43″ x 36″

Contained within the Atlas of Canada’s Reference Map Series, 1961 to 2010, is a map which has a detailed coverage of all parts of the world north of approximately 50 degrees latitude except for the Russian Federation side of the map which shows areas north of 60 degrees latitude. The map uses the Azimuthal Equidistant projection. All national boundaries are shown along with Canadian provincial and territorial boundaries and Canada’s 200 nautical miles offshore Exclusive Economic Zone. National capital cities are displayed along with other cities, towns, villages, and hamlets; all have been updated to 2008. Some seasonally populated places are also shown. A number of significant northern features can be found such as the minimum permanent polar sea ice extent for 1972 to 2007, tree line, undersea relief and undersea feature names, land relief, historical surveyed locations of the Magnetic North Pole from 1831 to 2007 and updated glaciers, ice fields, and coastal ice shelves. The undersea relief is the most up-to-date from the 2008 International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean on top of which bathymetric tints are shown. A related product is the round Circumpolar International Polar Year (2008) map. It is identical to this map except that it only shows map detail north of 55 degrees latitude.

Routes of the Explorers

$27.99
  • Routes of the Explorers
  • 24″ x 27″

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the routes followed by the principal explorers from 1497 up to 1905. Each route is marked as a red line on the map, giving the name of the explorer or company, and when that person traveled along the route. The map also provides the dates of the founding principal forts and trading posts of the French, Hudson’s Bay and North West Companies.

Ottawa & Toronto

$27.99
  • Ottawa & Toronto
  • 27″ x 20″

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows a map with four condensed maps of the cities Toronto and Ottawa. The first two maps show the extent and classification of land use circa 1955 for both Toronto and Ottawa. For Toronto, stages of urban growth are shown for periods ranging from 1793 to 1955 and for Ottawa, the periods range from 1826 to 1955. The urban growth maps represent the expansion of areas occupied by structures, yet the small open areas classified as parks and playgrounds on the land-use maps are also included. These two remaining maps show the extent and classification of land use for both of these cities. The classifications for land-use maps were separated into Industrial buildings; Industrial yards; Commercial buildings; Commercial yards; Railways and their installations; Institutional buildings; Residential buildings; Cemeteries; Dominantly farm land; Vacant land. In areas classified as dominantly farm land, vacant land includes forested areas, swamps, bogs and all large areas not put to specific agricultural use.

Vancouver & Victoria

$27.99
  • Vancouver & Victoria
  • 27″ x 20″

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows four condensed maps of both Vancouver and Victoria. The first two maps display stages of urban growth for Vancouver, for periods ranging from 1886 to 1956 and Victoria, for periods ranging from 1851 to 1955. The two remaining maps show the extent and classification of land use for 1955 for both of these cities. The urban growth maps represent the expansion of areas occupied by structures, yet the small open areas classified as parks and playgrounds on the land-use maps are also included.

Populated Places – Prairies

$27.99
  • Populated Places – Prairies
  • 27″ x 20″

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows as many populated places in the prairies as the scale of the map will permit. It also indicates, within certain limits, the number of inhabitants at each place according to the 1956 Census of Canada. The map also distinguishes between those places which were incorporated and those which were not. Therefore, it shows the urban municipalities in those parts of the various provinces covered by the map. Traditionally the Prairie Region is considered to consist of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba yet this map omits much of Alberta and includes part of northwestern Ontario.

Railways of Ontario & Quebec

$27.99
  • Railways of Ontario and Quebec
  • 24″ x 27″

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the rail companies that operated in Ontario and western Quebec, circa 1904. The railway lines are indicated in black, and the territory tributary to each line is shown in colours. For example, any area coloured green, is in a close proximity to a specific station on the Intercolonial railway, then to a station on any other system. This method is similarly applied to the other lines. The map includes statistics of the mileage, rolling stock, receipts, cost of construction and the cost of maintenance of the various railway lines for 1903-04. Some mileage data is as of 1905. The table also gives the Canadian total for these statistics as of June 30, 1904. The map displays the railway systems running across the border and into part of the U.S., but they do not own or control the Canadian railways.

Railway Freight Traffic

$27.99
  • Railway Freight Traffic
  • 27″ x 20″

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows three condensed maps of Canadian railway traffic circa 1954. Net tons per mile of road operated are indicated. ‘Net tons per mile of road operated’ is to be understood as meaning that, in 1954, the total net freight passing any point on a given line was of the tonnage indicated by the flow line at that point. In a few areas on the maps, traffic carried by lines closely paralleling each other and providing duplicate service between the same points is indicated by one pair of flow lines only. The flow data is broken down to show flow direction (either east and south or west and north). Data for freight carried by Canadian railways in the United States of America were not available.

Populated Places – Great Lakes Area

$27.99
  • Populated Places – Great Lakes Area
  • 27″ x 20″

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows as many populated places in the Great Lakes area as the scale of the map will permit. It also indicates, within certain limits, the number of inhabitants at each place according to the 1951 Census of Canada. The map also distinguishes between those places which were incorporated in cities, towns, and villages and those which were not. Therefore, it shows the urban municipalities in those parts of Ontario and Quebec covered by the map.